Safety & Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
Modified on 9/29/2021 at 02:32pm

Contact the Program of Hospital Epidemiology at 319-356-1606 or 24-hour pager 3158.

Latest guidance and policies from our Program of Hospital Epidemiology.

View our Safety Policy here

View We Stand for Safety Hub


Chief Medical Officer Theresa Brennan, MD, and the Operations branch of the UI Health Care Hospital Incident Command System (HICS) have reviewed each line of Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds’ order on personal protective equipment (PPE) and has determined that UI Health Care is in compliance with the order.

This site is provided for educational and informational purposes only and does not constitute providing medical advice or professional services. All information is meant for use by health care workers and not the general public. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room immediately. No physician-patient relationship is created by this web site or its use. Neither the University of Iowa nor its employees, nor any contributor to this web site, makes any representations or warranties, express or implied, with respect to the information provided herein or to its use.

 

Guidance on face masks

For staff: What type of mask you should wear and when
Updated on 08/16/2021 at 10:35 am

Effective Monday, Aug. 23:

  • In facilities where patients receive care (e.g., main campus, UI Health Care–Iowa River Landing, offsite clinics):  
    • Clinical areas: Patient care
      • All employees—regardless of vaccination staff—must wear a medical-grade mask.
      • Employees caring for a patient with COVID-19 or a person under investigation for COVID-19 (PUI), must wear an N95 respirator, regardless of vaccination status. This guidance applies to both the inpatient and outpatient setting.
    • Non-clinical areas: Hallways, cafeterias, shared workspaces, etc.
      • All employees—regardless of vaccination status—must wear a cloth or medical-grade mask.
  • In facilities where patients do not receive care (e.g., Carver College of Medicine buildings, HSSB): 
    • All employees—regardless of vaccination status—are strongly encouraged to wear a cloth or medical-grade mask.

View frequently asked questions about face masks and face coverings here.

For patients and visitors
Updated on 11/24/2020 at 8:46 am

In clinic areas, patients and visitors who present without a mask are to be given a mask to wear, either a cloth or medical-grade. Patients unable to wear a face mask for medical reasons will be provided a face shield. Face masks should not be worn by children under age 2.

In inpatient areas, all patients, regardless of COVID-19 infection status, are to wear a mask* when they leave their room (e.g., during transport, for procedures, walks, therapies). When the mask is not in use, it should be stored at their bedside in a clean, dry place and can be re-used as needed.

Patients who are COVID-19-positive are to wear a mask when staff enter their room. Exceptions may be made in a patient’s room only if the patient is physically unable to wear a mask.

*There may be some patients who cannot wear due to intolerance, clinical reason (e.g., intubated), or children under age 2.

CDC guidance for vaccinated individuals
Updated on 08/10/2021 at 11:06 am

As of July 27, 2021:

Updated information for fully vaccinated people given new evidence on the delta variant (B.1.617.2) currently circulating in the U.S.

  • It’s recommended that fully vaccinated people wear a mask in public indoor settings in areas of substantial or high transmission.
  • Fully vaccinated people might choose to wear a mask regardless of the level of transmission, particularly if they are immunocompromised or at increased risk for severe disease from COVID-19, or if someone in their household is immunocompromised, at increased risk of severe disease, or not fully vaccinated.
  • Fully vaccinated people who have come into close contact with someone with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 to be tested 3-5 days after exposure, and to wear a mask in public indoor settings for 14 days or until they receive a negative test result.
  • The CDC recommends universal indoor masking for all teachers, staff, students, and visitors to schools, regardless of vaccination status.

For unvaccinated individuals:

  • The CDC recommends that unvaccinated individuals continue to wear face masks in all indoor settings.

Source: CDC

Frequently asked questions about face masks

General safety and infection prevention principles

Best practices
Updated on 04/12/2021 at 4:11 pm

The safety of our staff and patients always comes first. Please take care of yourself and your work spaces as we strive to do our best for each other, our patients, and our community.

In clinical settings:

  • View the latest on the required PPE in clinical and non-clinical settings here.
  • Keep arms bare below the elbows in order to avoid sleeve contamination. This means that there should be nothing on your forearms, including wrist jewelry and watches. If you wear a long-sleeved shirt, roll up the sleeves.
  • Neckties, scarves, and long necklaces should not be worn.
  • Tie or clip up long hair.
  • Wipe down your stethoscope after each use.

 Work rooms and commonly shared work spaces:  

  • Wipe down surfaces with disinfectant wipes often.
  • It’s time to declutter. If surfaces are cluttered they are unable to be cleaned.
  • Wipe down shared computer keyboards, phones, door knobs, and other items you frequently touch before using.

Shared food:  

  • Food should not be consumed in areas other than designated break rooms.
  • Limit food sharing. There are potential health risks with communal food sharing, and it is strongly discouraged at this time.

Other best practices:

  • Practice social distancing (6 feet) whenever possible. Consider all opportunities to minimize contact with other employees.
  • Wash your hands often and avoid touching your face.

For staff who wear green scrubs:

  • Green scrubs are not to be worn outside of the hospital. If you currently have green scrubs at home, please bring them back to work as soon as possible so they can be laundered and reused appropriately.


View frequently asked questions about face masks here
.

Surface cleaning and disinfection guidance
Updated on 04/05/2021 at 10:42 am

A team has been regularly monitoring our supply of disinfectants over the past year. Recently, our supply of hospital-approved disinfectant wipes has grown enough that we can return to the use of approved disinfectant wipes, e.g. PDI AF3 (Grey top) wipes. Please place your order through Hospital Stores (6-1784).

Note: PDI Prime (Pink tops) wipes are available for disinfecting equipment that require alcohol. It may be used as a red top replacement. Staff should read the equipment Instructions For Use (IFU) or reach out to their equipment sales representative with additional questions.


Oxivir® Ready to Use

Download these instructions

For use as a one-step cleaner/disinfectant for environmental surfaces

(Reserved for Operating Rooms disinfection)

INSTRUCTIONS FOR USE:

  1. Carefully pour Oxivir® solution onto a new disposable cloth.
  2. Wet cloth with disinfectant; cloth should be damp, not dripping.
  3. Wipe all hard, non-porous surfaces with damp cloth.
  4. All surfaces must be visibly wet and allowed to air dry.

Note: Do not directly apply on electronics.

*DO NOT DISCARD EMPTY REFILL BOTTLES (Refill bottles will be cleaned and reused)

Oxivir® may be used to fill and refill clean, properly labeled containers.

*DO NOT POUR SOLUTION IN TUB OR BUCKET FOR MULTIPLE USES

Rationale: Improperly handled disinfectants may be contaminated with organisms that could lead to hospital-acquired infections.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR ORDERING:

  1. Call Stores (6-1784) to request new supply.
  • Oxivir® Ready to Use solution – Reusable (use PS# 139831)
  • Wipe Disposable for Oxivir® Ready to Use solution (use PS#156334)
  1. Stores will deliver a new supply of Oxivir® and pick-up empty bottle(s).

Reference:

William A. Rutala, P. M. (n.d.). Frequently Asked Questions. Retrieved from How should readers interpret the recommendation about contact time for disinfectants: http://vtwqt464m234djrhbie88e10-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/FAQ_Contact-time-for-disinfectants-used-on-noncritical-items.pdf

Keah KC. Et al. Bacterial Contamination of Hospital Disinfectants. http://www.e-mjm.org/1995/v50n4/Hospital_Disinfectants.pdf

Developed: Program of Hospital Epidemiology and Environmental Services 04/29/2020

Showers and hygiene products available for UI Health Care staff
Guidance on laundering of scrubs at home
Guidance on green scrubs

For staff who wear green scrubs:

Green scrubs are not to be worn outside of the hospital. If you currently have green scrubs at home, please bring them back to work as soon as possible so they can be laundered and reused appropriately.

Face shields and eye protection

Eye protection guidelines
Updated on 05/19/2021 at 11:55 am

Eye protection is no longer required during patient care (for both vaccinated and unvaccinated employees), unless required by isolation or splash precautions.

How to return your face shield
Updated on 07/01/2021 at 3:58 pm

Staff should return their face shields to Hospital Processed Stores located at 2050 Shipping and Receiving Facility between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. daily. Outside those hours, staff should call 319-356-7184 in order to access Hospital Processed Stores.

If you plan on returning 10 or more shields, please call 319-356-1784, as—depending on available space—the return may need to be scheduled.

Questions? Contact Don Jaggers at 319-384-7026.

Directions: From the Fountain Lobby, take the hallway between the Bread Garden kiosk and Elevator C. Follow it to the end, and take the elevator to Level 2 (it cannot be accessed from Level 2 of General Hospital).
How to properly clean face shields and CAPR Disposable Lens Cuffs (DLC)

Face shields should be cleaned after each use. 

PPE Reprocessing Instructions
CAPR disposable lens cuff 
  1. Obtain a clean horizontal surface for disinfecting reusables (Process begins with removal of PPE from face in anteroom or hallway)
  2. Hand hygiene
  3. While wearing gloves, carefully wipe the insidefollowed by the outside of the lens using an approved cleaner/disinfectant
  4. Check chin cuff integrity and inspect for damage; if damaged dispose
  5. Fully air dry
  6. Clean/disinfect the horizontal surface with approved cleaner/disinfectant
  7. Remove gloves and perform hand hygiene
  8. Place in envelope* labeled with healthcare worker’s name
  9. Hand Hygiene

Note: Re-used lens cuffs are to be re-used by a single wearer

Face shields and goggles
  1. Obtain a clean horizontal surface for disinfecting reusables (Process begins with removal of PPE from face in anteroom or hallway)
  2. Hand hygiene
  3. Don gloves
  4. Carefully wipe the inside, followed by the outside of the face shield or goggles using an approved cleaner/disinfectant
  5. Inspect for damage; if damaged dispose
  6. Fully air dry
  7. Clean/disinfect the horizontal surface with approved cleaner/disinfectant
  8. Remove gloves and perform hand hygiene
  9. Place in clean location labeled with health care worker’s name. Smaller face shields/goggles may be stored in an envelope*
  10. Hand hygiene

 

*Envelope: PS#156140

Definitions:

DLC: Disposable lens cuff

CAPR: Controlled Air Purifying Respirator

How to correctly remove a face shield

To remove the face shield without damaging it, loosen the knob that sits over the back of your head, and lift the face shield off with a straight upward motion of the headpiece (not the clear shield).

Guidance for avoiding neck pain with face shield use

View frequently asked questions about face shields here.

General personal protective equipment (PPE) guidance

PPE for treating a suspected or confirmed COVID-19 patient
Updated on 08/25/2021 at 10:54 am

Interim instructions for caring for a patient with COVID-19 (person under investigation* or confirmed)

Aug. 19, 2021

Please send requests for additional guidance to: InfectionPrevention@healthcare.uiowa.edu

Urgent requests: page 3158.

Situation Guidance
Isolation Precautions

PPE* in all clinical settings (Inpatient and Outpatient)

Modified Airborne   +  Contact Precautions  +   Eye Protection

Respirator (N95 or CAPR)  +      gown and gloves         +   face shield or goggles

NOTE: Staff—regardless of vaccination status—are required to wear an N95 respirator while caring for a patient with COVID-19 or for a person under investigation for COVID-19 (PUI). This guidance applies to both the inpatient and outpatient setting.

Patient transport (procedures or transferring units) Limit transport and movement of the patient outside of the patient room to medically essential purposes.

If procedures or tests are required and not able to be performed in the patient room OR if patient is being transferred to another unit, follow these steps:

  • Notify receiving department/unit of isolation status of patient
  • Wear respirator, gown, gloves and eye protection PPE to prepare the patient for transfer (e.g., transfer patient to the wheelchair or cart)
  • Place clean sheet over patient
  • Place a face mask on patient to contain secretions
  • Wipe bed rails/wheelchair handles down with approved disinfectant
  • Transporter wears mask.  Clean gloves may be stored in transporter’s pocket.

Receiving personnel should wear PPE for airborne, contact and eye protection (gloves, gown, respirator and eye protection)

After transport, equipment must be cleaned with approved disinfectant.

To transport patients who require care during transport (e.g. a critically ill patient) follow the guidance above with the addition of:

  • Persons transporting and caring for the patient wear a respirator, eye protection, gown and clean gloves.
  • Other transporters not providing care wear a surgical face mask, eye-protection and do not wear gloves.  This person will clear hallways if needed and open doors, activate elevator buttons, etc.
  • Healthcare workers who may need to wear gloves should not touch door handles, doors, elevator buttons, etc.

 

Food and Nutrition Nursing will take food trays into patient room and also remove them from patient room. No special handling of food tray necessary.
Environmental infection control Inpatients

Daily cleaning:

  • Will be performed by EVS

Terminal cleaning (after discharge):

  • Room does NOT need to sit vacant for 1 hour unless an AGP was performed within the last hour.
  • No AGP within last hour  EVS staff to clean wearing the following PPE:  gown, gloves, respirator and eye protection
  • If AGP within last hour – the room needs to sit vacant for 1 hour after patient discharge. EVS staff to clean wearing the following PPE:  gown, gloves, respirator and eye protection.

Procedural Areas (not Operating Room)

  • Room does NOT need to sit vacant for 1 hour unless an AGP was performed within the last hour.
  • No AGP within last hour – Staff to follow normal process and clean all surfaces. Wear the following PPE: gown, gloves, respirator and eye protection.
  • If AGP within last hour – the room needs to sit vacant for 1 hour after patient discharge. Staff to follow normal process and clean all surfaces. Wear the following PPE: gown, gloves, respirator and eye protection.

Outpatients

  • Room does NOT need to sit vacant for 1 hour unless an AGP was performed within the last hour.
  • No AGP within last hour – Clinic staff to clean all surfaces and equipment touched wearing the following PPE: gown, gloves, respirator and eye protection.
  • If AGP within last hour – the room needs to sit vacant for 1 hour after patient discharge. Clinic staff to clean wearing the following PPE:  gown, gloves, respirator and eye protection.

*Definitions

  • COVID-19 person under investigation: a person that is going to be or has been tested for COVID-19 and is awaiting results.
  • Modified Airborne precautions PPE: respirator (N95 respirator or CAPR)
    • Negative pressure room not required but recommended if available
  • Contact precautions PPE: gown + gloves
  • Eye protection: face shield or goggles
  • Aerosol generating procedures:
    • nebulized medication administration
    • manual ventilation before intubation
    • endotracheal intubation
    • extubation
    • BiPAP/CPAP
    • high-frequency oscillating ventilation
    • open suctioning
    • sputum induction
    • bronchoscopy
    • CPR
    • autopsy
Discontinuation of Isolation Precautions for Patients with COVID-19
Updated on 08/25/2021 at 10:53 am
COVID-19 Discontinuation of Isolation guidance for Inpatient providers
Updated on 12/11/2020 at 9:18 am

The Program of Hospital Epidemiology (PHE) recommends that the decision to resolve COVID precautions be discussed by the primary care team in rounds.

Discontinuation of COVID-19 Isolation Precautions criteria:        

Asymptomatic, mild, or moderate COVID-19 related symptoms (must meet all criteria):

  1. At least 10 days since symptoms first appeared (or positive test if asymptomatic)
  2. At least 24 hours with no fever (without fever-reducing medication)
  3. Symptoms have improved (e.g., cough, shortness of breath)

Severe to critical COVID-19 illness requiring ICU care or severe immunosuppression (must meet all criteria):

  1. At least 20 days since symptoms first appeared (or positive test if asymptomatic)
  2. At least 24 hours with no fever (without fever-reducing medication)
  3. Respiratory symptoms have improved or stabilized

What is considered a severe COVID-19 illness?

If the patient is in/has been in ICU for a severe COVID pneumonia requiring ventilatory support, then isolate for 20 days. You may make an exception if the ICU stay was brief, no intubation and/or patient condition quickly improved by day 10. We would defer to the clinical judgement of the primary provider/team.

What do you consider severe immunosuppression?

Many conditions and treatments can weaken a person’s immune system (making them “immunocompromised”). Some of these include:

  • Recently received chemotherapy or stem cells for cancer treatment
  • Bone marrow transplant
  • Solid organ transplant
  • Genetic or acquired immune deficiencies
  • Use of Oral or IV corticosteroids or other medicines called immunosuppressants that lower the body’s ability to fight some infections.

How are isolation dates determined?

The date of the test or the onset of symptoms is day 0.  In most cases we use the date of the test as symptoms are subjective.  Day 0 through day 10 (or 20) is the isolation period.  They are eligible to come out of isolation on day 11 or day 21.

How do I get the COVID-19 infection removed (resolved) from my patient’s chart?

  1. If your patient requires 10 day isolation: On day 11 after the first + test there is a Best Practice Advisory (BPA) that will fire to providers and if after review your patient meets the criteria you can choose to “Resolve the COVID-19 infection”. If you select the option “does not meet clinical criteria”, the BPA will not fire for another 5 days.
  2. If your patient requires 20 day isolation: the “does not meet clinical criteria” will need to be selected twice. The third time it fires will be day 21.  At that point you can re-evaluate and potentially resolve.

Do I need to talk with the Program of Hospital Epidemiology (PHE) to resolve an infection on a COVID-19 patient?

It is not a requirement to speak with PHE prior to resolving the COVID-19 infection and removing the patient from isolation.  We defer to the clinical judgement of the provider.  If the timing of the BPA does not allow you to resolve the COVID-19 infection and you have determined that your patient meets criteria to resolve, you can call 356-1606 or page 3158 between 8am-5pm to assist.

If I resolve the COVID-19 infection, what else do I need to do?

Discontinuation of isolation precautions should be the next step.  The patient should be in standard precautions (which currently requires eye shield and medical grade face mask) unless otherwise indicated.  No special placement required.  This should be communicated to the charge nurse or patient’s nurse.

Anesthesia guidelines
Updated on 05/12/2020 at 11:21 am
Resuming use of gowns in all instances of contact precautions
Updated on 05/22/2020 at 9:39 am

Effective immediately, gowns should be worn by faculty and staff in treating all patients in contact precautions. This guidance reverses the previous temporary guidance put into place to conserve our supply of gowns for staff treating patients with confirmed or suspected COVID-19. This reversal resumes normal contact precaution guidance.

The Program of Hospital Epidemiology also strongly recommends a continued focus on hand hygiene before and after all patient contact. As always, gowns should be worn if a splash or spray of blood or body fluids is anticipated.

Please contact Epidemiology (319-356-1606) for any questions.

Doffing tape-tab neck isolation gown
Updated on 11/18/2020 at 3:39 pm

PPE training

Training for all faculty and staff with patient contact

As part of University of Iowa Health Care’s ongoing efforts to protect the health of our community, we want you to be fully prepared should you care for patients with symptoms of COVID-19. We recognize that many of you have already had PPE training. This provides an additional opportunity to reinforce your knowledge with current video examples.

To help contain the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19), as well as ongoing flu instances, all employees with patient contact are required to complete these refresher trainings for use of personal protective equipment (PPE). The training courses are available online as compliance issues through Employee Self-Service and need to be completed by March 31.

For areas with a high potential to take suspected or confirmed COVID-19 patients, staff should complete the course as soon as possible. It will take approximately 10-20 minutes to complete.

For those UI employees who wish to take the training—but are not required—please note that it’s available through My Training in Employee Self-Service.

Download a PPE donning and doffing flyer here.

PPE conservation

UI Health Care is implementing centralized strategies to optimize the supply of our personal protective equipment (PPE) and reviewing potential clinical contingency plans.

Securing PPE/ensuring the highest level conservation

Effective immediately, we are following maximum conservation protocols for all critical personal protective equipment (PPE) and testing supplies. Although we presently have enough supplies, our supply chain remains vulnerable and availability changes daily. With everyone’s help, we can do this effectively while maintaining safety for our faculty and staff.

Our Supply Chain/Materials Management department is now centralizing the management of these supplies to ensure conservation and proper use.

Although we presently have enough supplies, our supply chain remains vulnerable and availability changes daily. To continue to keep people safe, we are implementing strategies to optimize the supply of our personal protective equipment (PPE) and are focused on clinical contingency planning.

Health care team members caring for patients in isolation precautions should only include the minimum number of individuals necessary for ensuring proper patient care. Additionally, rounding teams should only have the attending and one house officer enter the rooms of patients in isolation precautions.

Aerosol-generating procedure (AGP) guidance

Aerosol-generating procedure (AGP) guidance
Updated on 09/29/2021 at 12:51 pm

Aerosol-generating procedures (AGPs) are procedures performed on patients that are more likely to generate higher concentrations of infectious respiratory aerosols than coughing, sneezing, talking, or breathing. AGPs should be avoided if possible in patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 and should be performed in an AII room—if available—with a limited number of staff present, if possible.

Aerosol-generating procedures

Procedures commonly recognized as aerosol-generating:

  • Open suctioning of airway secretions*
  • Sputum induction
  • Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)
  • Endotracheal intubation and extubation
  • Manual ventilation
  • Nebulized medication administration
  • Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (e.g., BiPAP, CPAP)
  • Bronchoscopy
  • High-frequency oscillating ventilation
  • Disconnection of ventilator circuit to replace Filters/Heat Moisture Exchangers
  • Cough assist device

Procedures that are not believed to generate aerosols:

  • Coughing through mouth or tracheostomy
  • Oral cares
  • Swabs of OP, NP, or nares
  • Endotracheal cuff leak
  • NJ (nasojejunal)/NG (nasogastric) tube placement
  • Metered dose inhaler (MDI) with spacer
  • MDI-drug delivery into a ventilator circuit
  • Heated High Flow nasal cannula – adults, peds, neonate
  • Uncuffed ETTs (peds/neo)

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for AGP:

  • Asymptomatic patients or patients without respiratory symptoms —> N95 or CAPR + standard precautions (eye protection + gown + gloves if anticipating spray or splash)
  • Patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 (during AGP procedure and for 1 hour after procedure completion) —> N95 or CAPR + gown and gloves + eye protection

NOTE: This guidance applies to both the inpatient and outpatient setting.

*May be referred to as deep suctioning beyond oral suctioning. 

 For additional details on PPE selection and isolation precautions, see link

 References:

  • Alhazzani, et al. Surviving Sepsis Campaign: Guidelines on the Management of Critically Ill Adults with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19).
  • Cheng V, Wong S-C, Chen J, Yip C, Chuang V, Tsang O, et al. Escalating infection control response to the rapidly evolving epidemiology of the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) due to SARS-CoV-2 in Hong Kong. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2020 Mar 5 [Epub ahead of print].
  • Loeb, M. et al. SARS among critical care nurses, Toronto. Emerg. Infect. Dis. 10, 251–255 (2004)
  • Raboud, J. et al. Risk factors for SARS transmission from patients requiring intubation: a multicentre investigation in Toronto, Canada. PLoS One 5, e10717 (2010)
  • Prevention, C. f. (2020, May 4). Healthcare Infection Prevention and Control FAQs for COVID-19. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/infection-control-faq.html
  • Pichi, Barbara, et al. “CORONA-steps for tracheotomy in COVID-19 patients: A staff-safe method for airway management.” Oral Oncology 105 (2020): 104682.
  • Raboud, J. et al. Risk factors for SARS transmission from patients requiring intubation: a multicentre investigation in Toronto, Canada. PLoS One 5, e10717 (2010)
  • Tran, K.; Cimon, K.; Severn, M.; Pessoa-Silva, C.L.; Conly, J. Aerosol generating procedures and risk of transmission of acute respiratory infections to healthcare workers: A systematic review. PLoS ONE 2012, 7.
  • World Health Organization (https://www.who.int/news-room/commentaries/detail/modes-of-transmission-of-virus-causing-covid-19-implications-for-ipc-precaution-recommendations)
  • World Health Organization. Infection prevention and control during health care for probable or confirmed cases of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection. (2019)

N95 respirators

N95 respirators
Updated on 09/29/2021 at 12:51 pm

Our supply of N95 masks is stable enough for all frontline, direct care staff to use N95 masks during all aerosol generating procedures (AGPs) and when caring for COVID-19 patients and persons under investigation (PUI) for COVID-19.

View a list of AGPs here.

This guidance is applicable in all areas, except for perioperative and procedural settings (including the delivery rooms) where the patient has had a negative COVID-19 test in the last 48 hours. Personnel caring for patients who do not have COVID-19 in the NICU are not required to wear N95s during AGPs. In these settings existing PPE guidance should continue to be followed.

If you have not yet been fit tested to an N95

  1. First, complete the required OSHA survey in ReadySet
  2. Schedule a fit testing with the University Employee Health Clinic (UEHC). You can do this by calling UEHC at 319-356-3631 to schedule your 15-to-20-minute appointment. UEHC is located at 1097-1 Boyd Tower, at UI Hospitals & Clinics (Elevator A, Level 1). Hours are from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.

If you have already been fit tested to an N95

If you have already been fit tested to an N95 respirator, please confirm the make and model of your respirator by following these instructions.

If you are already fit tested to any other type of N95, no further action is needed.

View details about when you should wear an N95 here.

How to find the size of your N95 respirator
Updated on 05/18/2020 at 1:25 pm
N95 guide
Updated on 12/08/2020 at 1:21 pm

View frequently asked questions about N95 respirators to be used during aerosol-generating procedures here.

Controlled air purifying respirator (CAPR)

Controlled air purifying respirator (CAPR)
Updated on 09/08/2021 at 3:01 pm

While the CDC recommends universal source control measures for everyone in a health care facility, additional measures need to be taken to achieve source control* while wearing a CAPR.

For employees who are unable to successfully be fit-tested to wear an N95 respirator and must wear a CAPR:

  • A medical-grade face mask must be worn under the CAPR for source control*, so if the wearer is unknowingly infected with COVID-19, it is not being exhausted out of the helmet into the environment.

*Source control is very important to slow the spread of COVID-19. It involves the use of a well-fitting face covering to cover a person’s mouth and nose to prevent the spread of respiratory droplets.

Videos: Donning and doffing

COVID-19 with N95

COVID-19 with CAPR