Mid-year salary adjustments announced for 2,750 employees

More than 2,750 staff at University of Iowa Health Care will soon be seeing a little more in their paycheck due to a mid-year market adjustment made by hospital leadership.

“In order to continue to provide outstanding care for our patients, we also must take care of our own staff,” says Suresh Gunasekaran, chief executive officer of University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics, and associate vice president, University of Iowa Health Care. “One of the ways we are doing this is by making market adjustments that are more in line with the market.”

UI Health Care continuously monitors the market to ensure that our salaries are competitive. These analyses are then balanced against financial performance and operational priorities. At this time, we are able to provide mid-year market adjustments to nine employee classifications that were identified as most in need of adjustments to remain competitive in the market.

“Every employee is valued for their important contribution to the mission,” says Gunasekaran. While we are able to provide mid-year adjustments only for part of our workforce at this time, we will continue our ongoing review of job classifications for competitiveness.”

To learn more, see our frequently asked questions.

10 comments

  1. so I guess the rising cost of living in Johnson county Iowa doesn’t affect the merit staff here at the univ of iowa hospital. When are we going to be treated fairly? where is our raise? it has to be costing the univ a lot of money spent in turnover instead of paying and retaining employees. cmon lets treat everyone fairly not just the college educated!

    • Hi Lisa. Thanks for your comment. While we are able to provide mid-year adjustments only for part of our workforce at this time, we will continue our ongoing review of job classifications for competitiveness. Also, please note that this will not affect increases that come at the end of the fiscal year in July 2020.

  2. Stop patting yourselves on the back. This $10/month is not a raise, it’s an INSULT! It doesn’t even come close to covering the $34/month increase in my healthcare premiums. Perhaps the news media should be informed of the facts.

    • Hi Naomi. Thanks for your expressing your thoughts. While the total amount put toward the market adjustments for staff nurses, social workers, medical lab scientists, and imaging technologists, was large ($2.5 million) not all employees received the same amount (increases ranged from 0.25% to 6%). It’s good to keep in mind that this midyear adjustment does not impact annual raises that staff such as you received in July 2019 and will receive again in July 2020. At this time, no other classifications are receiving a midyear adjustment.

      If you have further questions, please be sure to talk to your nurse manager or HR representative.

  3. I appreciate that you recognize that nursing is under paid in this institution compared to nationally causing a employee retention problem. Respectfully, I must say I am confused by the approach with such a broad disparity in the distribution amongst the staff. I know you looked at the tenure ranges and turn over in those ranges to decide how to distribute the raises. The irony for me as a 34 year nurse in this institution is that the more loyal and dedicated to this institution you are the less you received. (My raise was 0.24%). I very much appreciate the raise but very disheartening as a long term dedicated employee to have received the least. Informal conversations with other staff and my management seem to indicate a general trend of the lower the tenure the higher the raise further flattening a already flattened pay range amongst nursing. If you are trying to attract and retain dedicated nurses you just clearly demonstrated that tenure and dedication is what is NOT rewarded. When I factor in using our “salaried pay status” to take away overtime, holding overtime pay for up to 3 months, pay raises over the last 10 years not keeping up with the cost of living and inflation (especially in Johnson County), and the increased cost of being a UIHC employee (the cost of parking alone accounts for approx.1.2%-2.2% of a nurses base pay take home salary for a surface lot) I make less money today than I did 10 years ago. If you want to retain staff I think you need to reevaluate your overall approach and stop taking financial advantage of long term loyalty and dedication. That includes all job descriptions. It takes a team to deliver quality care. There are no unimportant jobs in a healthcare setting and if the institution is doing well it is due to the overall team and ALL should be rewarded.

    • Pat, thank you for sharing your thoughts. While the total amount put toward the market adjustments for staff nurses, social workers, medical lab scientists, and imaging technologists, was large ($2.5 million) not all employees received the same amount. The amounts varied, based on individual situations. At this time, no other classifications are receiving a midyear adjustment. It’s good to keep in mind that this midyear adjustment does not impact annual raises that staff such as you received in July 2019 and will receive again in July 2020. If you have additional questions regarding your compensation, please talk with your nurse manager or contact your HR representative.

      Thank you again for sharing your perspective.

  4. I have a question that no one seems to be able give an answer to. I am a clerk III. When the PAC was created to answer incoming calls, that duty was taken away from the clerks and given to the them. The clinics were forced to “give up” a percentage of their clerks to join the PAC and were given the professional title of support service specialist. That title has a higher cap on salary. When some of these employees were hired from outside the university, I trained them here in my clinic, then they went to their positions in the PAC with the capability of making more salary than clerk III doing the exact same jobs. I even sometimes sit right next to an employee who is a support service specialist, doing the same job as I am as a clerk III, only for less pay. The only difference is that they are on the telephone and I have the patient in front of me….although sometimes I also interact with the patient on the phone as well. Please justify this discrepancy. You can’t. Two employees….side by side…doing the exact same job, the support service specialist.. probably a new hire..sitting next to me who has over 20 years in the clinic with a lot more knowledge of the job. I invite other clerk III’s to join me in an attempt to balance that salary!! # NOT FAIR UNIVERSITY OF IOWA!!

    • Teri, thank you for your comment.

      We regularly review job classifications and responsibilities. Although some positions may appear on the surface to be the same, other factors apply as well, such as scope, complexity of responsibilities, cross-training, etc. For more information on your specific situation, please contact your immediate supervisor or your HR representative.

  5. It is my understanding that the market adjustment was done because the lower nursing tiers were compressed because the starting salary for nurses was increasing faster than the actual salaries of the current employees. I am struggling to understand why new employees are worth more & more and starting salaries keep raising, but experienced staff do not see those same increases. Years ago nursing received a step (seniority) raise and a cost of living raise. The total 1-2% that we have recently seen does not even keep up with cost of living increases, or annual increases in benefit share. It is even more disheartening that our coworkers in different departments are valued even less as evidenced by their lack of increased compensation.

    • Hi, Liz, and thank you for your comment.

      Regarding starting salaries, they typically rise more for positions in markets where there is high demand and a shortage of qualified applicants. Our compensation package (salaries and benefits) needs to be competitive within those markets so we can attract the best talent. We also need to make sure our current employee salaries align with the market so that our team members stay with us. That is why we did this special mid-year adjustment. We will continue to review job classifications and market rates and address whenever we can. Also, this midyear adjustment does not impact annual raises that staff receives at the end of our fiscal year (July 2020).

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