Tag Archives: University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics

Cancer Genetics – it’s complicated – and exciting!

Incredible advances in cancer genetics have revolutionized how we think about cancer. These advances are now being applied to patient care. A brief response to the question “how is our growing knowledge of cancer genetics impacting on cancer research and cancer medicine?” is to say “it’s complicated – and exciting!” That is not a very helpful answer. Here, I will summarize the big picture with the understanding that this brief summary will not even touch on some of the rapidly evolving, nuanced, yet very exciting concepts in cancer genetics.

Let’s start out with a review and discussion of why the genetics revolution in cancer is so important.

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Scale

When I give a talk about cancer research, I like to highlight both the diversity of cancer research and that it is a continuum. One way to do this is by showing a scale that, going from smallest to largest, includes cancer research focused at the level of molecules, cells, tissues, organs, patients, clinical trials, cohorts, and communities. Much cancer research spans various points on this scale. I can take any two points on this scale, and talk about an important research project at Holden based on those two points. For example, molecular epidemiology involves taking samples from a large number of individuals in a group of cancer patients and evaluating them at the molecular level in order to improve our ability to predict how specific changes in genes might impact an outcome. Identifying new cancer drugs requires we screen large numbers of compounds to see which have the most promising effects on cancer cells, then after appropriate testing in the laboratory, assess the effects of these new drugs on patients in a clinical trial. Continue reading

So it goes …

In Slaughterhouse-Five, the masterpiece by Kurt Vonnegut (from our own Iowa Writer’s Workshop), the protagonist Billy Pilgrim used the phrase, “So it goes,” repeatedly when considering various traumas including the incredible horrors of war.  Much has been written about what Billy, and hence Mr. Vonnegut, really meant by this phrase.   I will not weigh in on this debate, but instead reflect on what this phrase means to me. Continue reading

Yogi Berra and Molecular Oncology

I can think of nothing better than Yogi Berra quotes to organize a brief discussion of how molecular oncology is impacting cancer medicine.

“It’s tough to make predictions, especially about the future.”

When I was growing up in New York, if you had asked me which was more likely – for me to spend my career as a cancer center director in Iowa, or to own a flying car, I most definitely would have predicted the flying car. So much for predicting the future. Continue reading

Left Brain vs. Right Brain. This week: No contest

Popular psychology describes the left side of the brain as logical/analytic and the right side as emotional /creative.   This dichotomy in anatomy and function is not supported by modern neuroscience, but I can’t resist using it since I want to talk about how my left brain and right brain have been going at each other this week. Continue reading

We can’t let the Brain Gain go down the Drain

We are currently recruiting to bring new faculty physicians to the Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, faculty who will help us care for our patients, teach, and conduct research. The faculty candidates we have had visit the University of Iowa have been outstanding, and we look forward to having a number of them join us this summer.

During this process, I have been struck by the number of superb applicants who began their medical careers in many other countries around the world, completed their medical training at top-notch programs in the United States, and now want to join our faculty so they can practice medicine, teach and do research in the United States (indeed, in Iowa). Uniformly, these individuals were at the top of their class in school, had the drive to come to the United States to pursue opportunities they did not have in their native country, and have been highly successful in their new home.  This represents a true “brain gain” for us. Continue reading

What’s in a name? It’s personal and it’s precise

There is a great debate raging among cancer research leaders around the country.

  • It is not about whether this is an incredible time in cancer research that is fundamentally changing our understanding of cancer – we all see advances being made in our centers every day.
  • It is not about whether this enhanced understanding of cancer will change how we approach cancer medicine – we all see research advances that have resulted in dramatic improvements in how we treat many of our patients, and many more are on the way.
  • It is not about whether some cancers have proven to be incredibly difficult to treat – we all know there are some types of cancer where progress has been devastatingly slow.
  • It is not about whether increased funding for cancer research would speed up progress against cancer – we all agree that increased funding is needed to accelerate progress, particularly for the most refractory cancers.

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Congratulations to Dr. Raymond Hohl

Earlier this month, Dr. Raymond Hohl, the Holden Family Chair and Associate Director for Clinical and Translational Research at the Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, announced that, starting March 1, 2014, he will be moving to Penn State to become the Director of the Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute.   Ray has been at the University of Iowa since 1991, and has served multiple roles in the Cancer Center, Department of Internal Medicine, and many other units on campus.  The breadth of his clinical and research knowledge and interests made Ray a valued leader and collaborator in many of the activities at Holden.  As a physician, his dedication to his patients was unquestionable. Continue reading

Lump or spread?

Sometimes, progress brings uncertainty.  The past few years have seen a steady increase in the number of drugs and other approaches to cancer treatment such as immunotherapy that can be used to treat cancer.  Most of these new approaches do not cure cancer when given as a single therapy.  Nevertheless, many of them are very effective at inducing a temporary shrinking of the cancer.   For many cancers, we have a number of such treatments available.  From a physician’s point of  view, these new treatments create more options for patients. But they raise  a question that cancer doctors have struggled with for decades.  Do we … Continue reading

Careful assessing is better than second-guessing

Several years ago, I made a “decision” that I needed to figure out a better way to make decisions.

We all struggle with decisions whether big or small. We all sometimes delay making difficult decisions, or revisit the decision once it is made again and again. For me, difficult decisions can vary from deciding what treatment to recommend for a cancer patient, to determining how best to structure a new cancer research program, to deciding whether I should attend yet another meeting. There are times when I feel overwhelmed by the sheer number, the potential consequences and the variety of decisions that need to be made, particularly if I put off the difficult ones and let them build up. Continue reading