Tag Archives: patients

Putting a patient “on trial?”

Last week, I had the pleasure of giving a talk on cancer at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine Mini-Medical School, a series of presentations provided to the lay public to introduce them to a topic in medicine. Every time I give a talk to a lay audience, I think back to a wonderful woman I had as a patient when I was doing my oncology training in the 1980s. She was a retired English teacher who took pleasure in gently ribbing me about the words I selected when I spoke with her (once a teacher, always a teacher). I recall one time when I suggested we consider putting her “on trial.” Her response – “Put me on trial? What a strange phrase. I certainly wish getting cancer was against the law! Why do you want to put me on trial?” That lead to an animated conversation about not only that phrase, but how doctors use expressions when talking to each other that are interpreted differently by patients. While I don’t recall which additional specific phrases we discussed back then, that conversation had a long lasting effect on me, and the phrases I use when I speak to patients, families and the public.

Continue reading

So it goes …

In Slaughterhouse-Five, the masterpiece by Kurt Vonnegut (from our own Iowa Writer’s Workshop), the protagonist Billy Pilgrim used the phrase, “So it goes,” repeatedly when considering various traumas including the incredible horrors of war.  Much has been written about what Billy, and hence Mr. Vonnegut, really meant by this phrase.   I will not weigh in on this debate, but instead reflect on what this phrase means to me. Continue reading

We can’t let the Brain Gain go down the Drain

We are currently recruiting to bring new faculty physicians to the Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, faculty who will help us care for our patients, teach, and conduct research. The faculty candidates we have had visit the University of Iowa have been outstanding, and we look forward to having a number of them join us this summer.

During this process, I have been struck by the number of superb applicants who began their medical careers in many other countries around the world, completed their medical training at top-notch programs in the United States, and now want to join our faculty so they can practice medicine, teach and do research in the United States (indeed, in Iowa). Uniformly, these individuals were at the top of their class in school, had the drive to come to the United States to pursue opportunities they did not have in their native country, and have been highly successful in their new home.  This represents a true “brain gain” for us. Continue reading