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Archive for the ‘Adam Rauckhorst’ Category

FOEDRC Retreat Poster Winners: Po Hien Ear and Adam Rauckhorst

Thursday, January 5th, 2017

Congratulations to Postdoctoral Fellows Po Hien Ear (Brenner Lab) and Adam Rauckhorst (Taylor Lab) who were two of the three poster winners at the 2016 FOE Diabetes Research Center Retreat held on December 10, 2016, for their posters entitled “Nicotinamide riboside promotes maternal and neonatal health benefits” and “Novel mechanisms regulating mitochondrial glutamine metabolism,” respectively.

L to R: Adam Rauckhorst, Po Hien Ear, Yanhui Zhang, E. Dale Abel

2016 Biochemistry Newsletter now available

Friday, November 4th, 2016

2016_newslettercoverimageThe 2016 Biochemistry @ Iowa newsletter is hot off the presses and available for download. Alumni and friends should receive a hard copy in the mail this week. If you would like to be added to our mailing list, please send your contact information to biochem@uiowa.edu. While you are at it, feel free to send us your news and updates! Previous newsletters are also available online.

Taylor Lab publish in the Journal of Biological Chemistry

Friday, February 12th, 2016

Drs. Larry Gray and Adam Rauckhorst of the Taylor Laboratory recently published an article entitled “A Method for MultiplexedMeasurement of Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier Activity,” in the Journal of Biological Chemistry. Mitochondrial pyruvate uptake is a central metabolic decision that affects cellular energy production, carbon flux through multiple biosynthetic pathways, and commitment to cellular fate. The recent discovery of the genes encoding the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC), the protein complex that conducts pyruvate into the mitochondrial matrix, has invigorated studies on the regulation of mitochondrial pyruvate uptake. An effective activity assay is important for these efforts but previous methods were constrained by high sample requirements and a single replicate-based workflow. Drs. Gray and Rauckhorst co-developed a 96-well scaled assay that enables much greater throughput with substantially decreased mitochondrial sample requirements. They applied this method to provide the first report on the Km and Vmax of the mouse liver MPC. They expect this assay will be useful for understanding the regulation of MPC activity under diverse physiological conditions in health and disease.