Link: University of Iowa

Archive for the ‘Post-docs and Research Scientists’ Category

2017 Biochemistry Newsletter now available

Thursday, November 16th, 2017

The 2017 Biochemistry @ Iowa newsletter is hot off the presses and available for download. Alumni and friends should receive a hard copy in the mail this week. If you would like to be added to our mailing list, please send your contact information to biochem@uiowa.edu. While you are at it, feel free to send us your news and updates! Previous newsletters are also available online.

Ryan Sheldon receives F32 award

Monday, September 18th, 2017

Ryan Sheldon, a Postdoc in the Taylor laboratory, received an F32 Postdoctoral Fellowship awarded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Dr. Sheldon’s project entitled “Regulation of Hepatic Lipogenesis by a Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier-Citrate Carrier Axis,” addresses the major public health problem of hyperlipidemia during Type 2 Diabetes.

Excess lipid production in the liver during type 2 diabetes leads to elevated lipids in the liver and circulation, which in turn drives many diabetes associated complications. The liver can make lipids from glucose. To do this, the glucose metabolite pyruvate is imported into mitochondria, converted to citrate, and exported to the cytosol, where is it channeled into pathways for making cholesterol and fatty acids. This research project seeks to understand how the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier and mitochondrial citrate carrier work together to influence liver lipid synthesis, accumulation, and release. Success may reveal opportunities for decreasing liver and circulating lipid content, thereby improving health outcomes in type 2 diabetes.

Congratulations, Ryan!

Taylor Lab wins FOEDRC Research Day scientific poster awards

Thursday, April 27th, 2017

Adam Rauckhorst (center) & Arpit Sharma (second from right) along with the other FOEDRC poster winners.

Graduate Student Arpit Sharma’s poster entitled “Loss of Skeletal Muscle Mpc1 in Mice Stimulates Fatty Acid Oxidation, Nitrogen Retention, and Leanness,” won the award for best poster in the pre-doctoral category.

Postdoc Adam Rauckhorst’s poster entitled “The mitochondrial pyruvate carrier mediates high fat diet-induced increases in hepatic TCA cycle capacity and hyperglycemia,” tied with three others for the best poster in the post-doctoral/Jr. faculty category.

FOEDRC Retreat Poster Winners: Po Hien Ear and Adam Rauckhorst

Thursday, January 5th, 2017

Congratulations to Postdoctoral Fellows Po Hien Ear (Brenner Lab) and Adam Rauckhorst (Taylor Lab) who were two of the three poster winners at the 2016 FOE Diabetes Research Center Retreat held on December 10, 2016, for their posters entitled “Nicotinamide riboside promotes maternal and neonatal health benefits” and “Novel mechanisms regulating mitochondrial glutamine metabolism,” respectively.

L to R: Adam Rauckhorst, Po Hien Ear, Yanhui Zhang, E. Dale Abel

2016 Biochemistry Newsletter now available

Friday, November 4th, 2016

2016_newslettercoverimageThe 2016 Biochemistry @ Iowa newsletter is hot off the presses and available for download. Alumni and friends should receive a hard copy in the mail this week. If you would like to be added to our mailing list, please send your contact information to biochem@uiowa.edu. While you are at it, feel free to send us your news and updates! Previous newsletters are also available online.

Taylor Lab publish in the Journal of Biological Chemistry

Friday, February 12th, 2016

Drs. Larry Gray and Adam Rauckhorst of the Taylor Laboratory recently published an article entitled “A Method for MultiplexedMeasurement of Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier Activity,” in the Journal of Biological Chemistry. Mitochondrial pyruvate uptake is a central metabolic decision that affects cellular energy production, carbon flux through multiple biosynthetic pathways, and commitment to cellular fate. The recent discovery of the genes encoding the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC), the protein complex that conducts pyruvate into the mitochondrial matrix, has invigorated studies on the regulation of mitochondrial pyruvate uptake. An effective activity assay is important for these efforts but previous methods were constrained by high sample requirements and a single replicate-based workflow. Drs. Gray and Rauckhorst co-developed a 96-well scaled assay that enables much greater throughput with substantially decreased mitochondrial sample requirements. They applied this method to provide the first report on the Km and Vmax of the mouse liver MPC. They expect this assay will be useful for understanding the regulation of MPC activity under diverse physiological conditions in health and disease.

Larry Gray wins PBI postdoctoral fellow best paper competition

Monday, January 25th, 2016

Larry GrayDr. Larry Gray, postdoctoral fellow in the Taylor Lab, received the first place $750 travel award in the recent Pappajohn Biomedical Institute (PBI) competition for best postdoctoral fellow paper of 2015. Dr. Gray’s paper entitled “Hepatic Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier 1 Is Required for Efficient Regulation of Gluconeogenesis and Whole-Body Glucose Homeostasis” was published in the October 6th issue of Cell Metabolism. Dr. Gray’s research demonstrates that disrupting mitochondrial pyruvate uptake in the liver attenuates high blood sugar in models of type 2 diabetes.

Taylor lab publishes in Cell Metabolism

Tuesday, September 8th, 2015

The Taylor laboratory has recently published an article entitled “Hepatic Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier 1 Is Required for Efficient Regulation of Gluconeogenesis and Whole-Body Glucose Homeostasis” in Cell Metabolism. Postdoctoral Fellow Larry Gray was first author of this work.

Gray et al. show that the Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier (MPC), is critical for controlling glucose production in the liver and could potentially be a new target for drugs to treat diabetes. Dr. Taylor is quoted in UI News The Loop, “Essentially, we found that disruption of the MPC makes the liver less efficient at making glucose and, as a result, the liver burns more fat for energy, makes less cholesterol, and makes less glucose in models of diabetes.” He continued, “This overall change in metabolism matches outcomes that would be therapeutically desirable for people with diabetes.” Read the full feature on their article here.

 

Price lab featured on the August cover of Molecular Cell

Thursday, August 20th, 2015

MOLCEL_59_4.c1.inddDavid Price‘s lab was featured on the August 20 cover of Molecular Cell. The article entitled “THZ1 Reveals Roles for Cdk7 in Co-transcriptional Capping and Pausing,”shows how a Cdk7 inhibitor, THZ1, dramatically impacts CTD phosphorylation, co-transcriptional capping, pausing, and P-TEFb-dependent productive elongation by disrupting an ordered exchange of factors after initiation. These results provide mechanistic insights into the anti-proliferative and super-enhancer-selective effects of THZ1 seen by others. Kyle Nilson, (Molecular and Cellular Biology Graduate Student in the Price Lab) was first author of this work. John Brogie (Biochemistry Graduate Student), Michael Turek (Biochemistry Undergraduate Major), and Jiannan Guo (Former Biochemistry Postdoc, Price Lab) also contributed to this work. The cover design by Kyle Nilson features and experiment “performed” by Nicholas Mullen (Biochemistry Undergraduate Major).

The article is also featured in a preview by Drs. Frédéric Coin and Jean-Marc Egly entitiled “Revisiting the Function of CDK7 in Transcription by Virtue of a Recently Described TFIIH Kinase Inhibitor.”

Congratulations Price Lab!!

Emma Morrison receives Arnold O. Beckman Postdoctoral Fellows Award

Wednesday, July 1st, 2015

Emma MorrisonEmma Morrison, a postdoctoral fellow in the Musselman laboratory, received an Arnold O. Beckman Postdoctoral Fellows Award for her project entitled “Multivalent readout of histone PTMs in chromatin regulation by BPTF: a structural and dynamic perspective,” which aims to investigate the combinatorial readout of multiple histone post-translational modifications by the linked PHD finger and bromodomain module of BPTF. Arnold O. Beckman Postdoctoral Awards support postdoctoral scholars who have the highest potential for success in an independent academic career in chemistry and the life sciences, and are intended to assist in their transition from “mentored yet independent” postdoctoral to an independent, tenure-track position. Congratulations, Emma!